Tag Archives: Change

Change

It’s certainly cliche, but change is all around us. If you’re new to Tai Chi, perhaps change brought you to the first step on this path. If Tai Chi is “old hat” to you, then you’re many steps down a path that really has no ending, and exemplifies finding your way without needing to arrive.

Tai Chi represents change in many ways: we study changes in weight distribution forward and backward, up and down, left to right, and between ourselves and our assailant; we study the nature of our body’s movement – how the arms and legs move, how the hips/waist direct movement of the limbs; we study changes in how we perceive our surroundings as we learn the art – at first focusing close to monitor footwork and movement, and then focusing further afield to monitor our imagined adversary; we study how we breathe when we move, as we learn to visualize breath movement and seek to access the meditational levels of Tai Chi; and we seek to study how an adversary moves so that we can learn the self-defense aspects of each and every movement in this art.

Change continues outside of us as we learn Tai Chi, and it is this change perhaps to which we need to pay closer attention.  Tai Chi is hopefully teaching us to be more calm and philosophical in the face of change: the ways in which our family’s grow and adapt, the ways in which we personally grow and adapt to work and society, and the ways in which society changes to ongoing ups and downs.

We each pay attention to different arena’s of change: some have a focus on the social scene, some on politics, some on sports, some on the comedy in life situations, and some the business side of life.  Of course many people are able to blend a couple or several of these areas, in varying depths of understanding.

Looking to the business side of things, I recently heard news that in addition to increased (five-fold) foreign investment, Myanmar, a.k.a, Burma, is experiencing workers organizing for better work conditions. Adam Smith’s invisible hand generally needs help from the visible voice of concerned workers. I believe that worker organization will run its course in the Asian economies, bringing about worker-focused reform, while encouraging even more investment.

The “developing” economies of the world are in many cases are only now going through the industrial revolution and work-life revolution that the long-industrialized sectors of the globe began to work through long ago.  This is change on a huge scale, on a scary, in-person scale, to be sure, but it is change that must occur: if these economies are to catch up with their peers, they must (or should) also learn to work with their employees for the betterment of all.

Note that the binoculars of social change looks not only outward to the rest of the world, but must also look back to the long-industrialized parts of the globe.  As life is in constant flux, America for instance is not perfect: we have many labor and business issues that are in dire need of resolution, some of which are rearing their heads right here in Pittsburgh, PA as the long road from manufacturing-based employment continues to shift over to service-employment.

Does your study of Tai Chi, whatever the intensity, give you greater perspective as you move through life?

..Alex.